Recent memorabilia

Posted By on March 22, 2013

Hi,
A huge thank you to Michael Nicholson, Knox’s grandson, for reading the blog and contacting me about some of Knox’s belongings. I got an amazing package in the mail containing Knox’s call letters (K6DG), some distinguishing radio plaques, and the actual camera (in its original case) Knox used to take all of the beautiful photos on this site.

What an amazing gift. I hope you all enjoy the photos, and thanks again Michael!

Radio call letters

Finally home!

Posted By on August 10, 2012

Fini la guerre
“No more war”

World War One Letters Blog

MESS ACCOUNT
First Aero Squadron
7/11/18 Joined Squadron
7/17/18 Initiation Fee—30.00
Mess for July—110.00 with rations deducted from 7/22
8/1/18 Mess—August rations—140.00
8/31/18 Mess—September rations—150.00
9/5/18 Mess—rations for 10 days—additional 50.00
10/6/18 Mess—October—200.00
11/2/18 Mess—November—200.00
11/24/18 Mess—November rations for 9 days extra—50.00
12/2/18 Mess—December—200.00

Checks
$100.00 4161 2/10/19
$200.00 4307 2/11/19
Treasury of U.S.
RR Calkins

March 21-23, 1919

Posted By on August 8, 2012

**Journal**
March 21, 1919
Went through Omaha and will reach Cheyenne tonight sometime. Feel level. Certainly appreciate the meals in the diner.

**Journal**
March 22, 1919
Crossed Salt Lake this afternoon. Lots of water. Expect to arrive tomorrow night. Telegraphed home from Ogden this noon.

World War One Letters BlogTELEGRAM
Ogden, Utah 312 P.
March 22, 1919
W. J. Nicholson
1534 Scenie Ave Berkeley Cal
Will arrive Oakland sixteenth street station Sunday afternoon four thirty. 320 P.
Knox.

**Journal**
March 23, 1919
Sunday: Arrived home 4:30 PM.

March 19-20, 1919

Posted By on August 6, 2012

**Journal**
March 19, 1919
On board Manhattan headed for Chicago. Received discharge out at Camp Dix at noon. Came to Philadelphia at once, leaving there at 8 PM. Sent telegram this afternoon.

World War One Letters BlogTELEGRAM
Philadelphia, pa.
March 19, 1919
W. J. Nicholson,
1534 Scenie Ave Berkeley Cal
Received discharge leaving for home tonight will wire en route.
Knox.

**Journal**
March 20, 1919
On board Overland headed for San Francisco. Arrived Chicago this afternoon at 3 PM. Caught the 4:10 train out. Walked around a little. Will reach Oakland Sunday night. Train crowded. Met Lt. Sprado.

March 18-19, 1919

Posted By on August 3, 2012

TELEGRAM
Philadelphia, Pa.
March 18, 1919
W. J. Nicholson, Supreme Court, San Francisco.
Landed Philadelphia three weeks trip reporting Camp Dix. Discharge well.
Knox.

World War One Letters Blog

Hostess House, National Young Women’s Christian Association
Camp Dix, New Jersey
March 19, 1919
Dear Folks:
Back at last! As you know from the telegram I sent last night, I landed at Philadelphia yesterday afternoon at 2 P.M. on the Louis K. Thurlow. There were only three of us on board, two captains and myself. We came out here to Camp Dix, a forty mile ride, at once. It is now ten A.M. and we have completed our “paper work” regarding the discharges and are simply waiting for the orders to come through making us civilians again. They may come out this afternoon but tomorrow morning for sure. As soon as they come I will leave immediately for Philadelphia and catch the first train for the West you may be sure. Will send a telegram to the office in S.F. a day before arrival so you will know when and where to expect me. You will probably get that telegram just about the same time you receive this letter.
There is a lot of red tape to go through here at the demobilization center. We had a thorough physical examination this morning, and filled out a stack of forms regarding our past, present and future. Our discharge will be mailed to us later.
World War One Letters BlogI suppose you are anxious to hear of the trip across. It was quite pleasant and uneventful, although drawn out a bit. The Philadelphia Ledger this morning blossomed out with the enclosed. Where they got the information is more than I know, most likely from the debarkation office. We left Bordeaux on the morning of February 26. We went down the river, a trip of 90 miles, reaching the ocean at sunset. The bar was so rough though that the French pilot wouldn’t take us across, so we anchored there until morning. I might describe the Thurlow now. She is a lake boat 300 feet long, commissioned in the Navy. There were no regular quarters for passengers, so we were fixed up as comfortably as possible. It was far from being “deluxe” but we were so glad to get anything no one thought of complaining. The mess was “rough.” That is the only way to express it. It was meat three times a day every day, but again no one complained, because we were actually on the way home. The first three days I was really seasick. There was no doubt about it. I tried to eat, but couldn’t keep off my back long enough to down enough to do any good, and what did get down wouldn’t stay there. So for three days I lived on hope. At the end of that time the sea quieted down and I began to come around OK. After getting away with three or four good meals I felt all right again. From that time on I never had a touch of it again, even though we had some much rougher weather. About half way across we had a 48 hour blow that brought us to a standstill. The last eight hours we had to head into it to stop the rolling. Opinion varied as to its velocity. The Lt. Commander said 80 miles and the others 100. Anyway, it blew harder than I have ever seen or heard before. After that blow we had good weather except for some rainy days. We took the southern route, passing south of the Azores and skimming the Bermudas. This route is much smoother than the northern one this time of the year, although much longer. The ship logged 3800 miles for the trip.
On the morning of March 17th at 11 o’clock we first sighted the lighthouse on Cape May. It was certainly a treat to watch the shore gradually come into view. We picked up a pilot and started up the river to Philadelphia, a nine hours’ run. We had to anchor off quarantine at sunset, though half way up, and remain overnight. At daybreak on the 18th the doctor came out and soon ordered us to proceed on our way. We docked at 2 P.M. and I’m telling you it didn’t take us long to hop ashore. Here is where the “class” comes though. A Dodge car met us and took me up to the Headquarters building. They then sent a truck down for our baggage, taking it to the ferry. Then they took us down to the ferry, gave us our tickets, had our baggage already checked and wished us a bon voyage. We were not used to receiving such consideration in France. Over there, it’s get your luggage the best way you can, and shift for yourself generally.
I had the most wonderful shampoo and hair cut possible before leaving for the train. Also I realized one of my dreams of months. I went into a hotel and had a big piece of peach pie completely hidden by strawberry ice cream. The realization beat the anticipation this time, too.
Well, will see you soon now, within a week anyway.
Lost ten pounds on the way over, weighting 158 this morning.
Lovingly,
Knox.

March 15-18, 1919

Posted By on August 1, 2012

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 15, 1919
Sea smooth today but a little head wind which is holding us up a little. Expect to reach land by Tuesday. Feel OK.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 16, 1919
Sunday: Fine weather. Expect to reach Delaware Breakwater tomorrow noon. Will probably search Philadelphia Tuesday AM. Feel OK and eating all I can get ahold of.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 17, 1919
Smooth sea! Wonderful day. Sighted land at 11:45. Looked mighty good. Pilot came aboard and took us up the river. Anchored off quarantined until morning. Too late for inspection.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 18, 1919
Camp Dix: Arrived Philadelphia at 2 PM. Sent telegrams home. Came down here at 4 PM. Have now made out papers for discharge. Expect to leave tomorrow for Philadelphia and them HOME.

March 12-14, 1919

Posted By on July 30, 2012

**Journal**
March 12, 1919
No entry.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 13, 1919
Had a fierce storm yesterday and last night. Wind blew 80-100 miles the skipper says. The old ship certainly did ride the waves. I sat up till midnight, afraid of being thrown out of my bunk. Wasn’t sick though, but a little scared.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 14, 1919
Wind went down, but sea is still running high. Received orders by radio today to proceed to Philadelphia. That suits me fine. Good train service West.

World War One Letters Blog

March 8-11, 1919

Posted By on July 27, 2012

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 8, 1818
Wind changed today. Rougher than usual and slower speed. Feel OK though. Pretty dirty trip due to coal dust and candles.

World War One Letters Blog

World War One Letters Blog**Journal**
March 9, 1919
Sunday: Ran into a still squall this P.M. Wind blew hard and sea was rough. Some rain and fog later. We tossed about like a cork. I hit my bunk to keep my dinner.

**Journal**
March 10, 1919
Wind blew itself out this A.M. Sea moderate now. Got some of my things back that I lost out of my trunk. Hope to get it all back. Our destination is in doubt now. Will receive our orders by radio in a few days.

**Journal**
March 11, 1919
Wind came up this afternoon. Blowing a fresh gale now. They are looking for a storm within next 12 hours. Barometer has fallen rapidly. Hope they are mistaken.

March 5-7, 1919

Posted By on July 25, 2012

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 5, 1919
Sea smooth and wind behind us. Warm. Expect to pass the Agores tonight at midnight. Feel pretty good now, and good appetite. Counting the days now to New York news.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 6, 1919
Made good time today. Wind and sea with us now. Feeling all right and eating thrice a day. Time hangs heavy though.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 7, 1919
Made good time again today. We are all trying to figure out when we will get to Norfolk. Looks like it will be about the twentieth. Rougher today, but wind is still with us. Feel OK.

March 1-4, 1919

Posted By on July 23, 2012

**Journal**
March 1, 1919
Still rough and still not eating. Had some bread and butter, but couldn’t keep it. They say it is going to calm down soon. Hope so.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
March 2, 1919
Sunday: Soother today. Feel pretty good, but have to stick to bunk pretty close.

World War One Letters Blog

World War One Letters Blog**Journal**
March 3, 1919
Head wind keeping us back. Only making about 5 knots per hour. Feeling better.

**Journal**
March 4, 1919
Wind is behind us now and sea has clamed down. Ship making 10 knots now. Passing ship reported a mine in our route this P.M. Feel pretty good now and eating three meals a day. Very warm down here.