February 25-18, 1919

Posted By on July 20, 2012

**Journal**
February 25, 1919
Rec’d my orders this AM to go aboard the S.S. Thurlow. Came aboard at 2:30. Expect to sail tomorrow. Small boat, 300 feet long. We’re carrying back DHAs. Not very agreeable quarters but am glad to get anything. Two captains are going also.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 26, 1919
Sailed at noon. Spent the afternoon running down the river. Wind blowing hard, but so far haven’t hit the ocean proper. Expect it to be rough. Good mess.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 27, 1919
Anchored last night at mouth of river because it was too rough to cross the bar. Continued this A.M. and it was rough. Am still sick. No meals today for me.

 

World War One Letters Blog**Journal**
February 28, 1919
Still rough and am still upset. Tried to eat but it wasn’t a success.

February 20-24, 1919

Posted By on July 18, 2012

**Journal**
February 20, 1919
Magee left today. He expects to sail on the Luka Gasper this P.M. Now I’m at the top of the list and will get the next ship. Looks like it will either be the Honolulu or Wyandotte. Rain all day. Very tiresome sitting around here.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 21, 1919
Went down to docks today. Honolulu and Wyandotte are about ready. Don’t know if there is any A.S. material aboard though. General P. is expected here so we are all detailed with men to clean up the camp.

**Journal**
February 22, 1919
Still busy cleaning up. No news about leaving. These are “strenuous times.” Went down to docks again this A.M. Rain all day. Wish I would get a ship as this camp here is quite monotonous and full of “details.”

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 23, 1919
Sunday: Nothing new. Same old story. This camp life is pretty dull. Two hours hike in morning and afternoon. We usually get down to the docks once a day.

World War One Letters Blog**Journal**
February 24, 1919
Ditto.

February 16-19, 1919

Posted By on July 16, 2012

**Journal**
February 16, 1919
Sunday: Nothing new. Rain all day. Many rumors running around about embarkation of troops being stopped. Hope to get aboard a ship before any such order is put in effect. Expect a rough time. Bryan got off reportedly on the Niagrin.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 17, 1919
Nothing new today. Went down to the dock again looking around. Rain on and off. Many ships in. Camp here is getting monotonous. Fair quarter and satisfactory mess, though. Nothing to do in evenings.

World War One Letters Blog**Journal**
February 18, 1919
Nothing new today. Heard that Gale will get his orders tomorrow. That puts me second from the top. Rain showers all day. Looked the dock over again today. Ships look good all right.

 

 

 

**Journal**
February 19, 1919
Gale left us today. Went aboard the Ceylon Main, a Jap ship. He is the only passenger. Don’t envy him. Looks now like I might get the Honolulu as “my” boat. Hope so. We are watchfully waiting. Rain all day.

World War One Letters Blog

February 12-15, 1919

Posted By on July 13, 2012

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 12, 1919
We moved out to the Embarkation Camp near the docks. Walked down to them this afternoon looking at the ships. Met Bryan out here again. Nice warm weather here. We are up on a hill overlooking the river.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 13, 1919
Carter left today as did Paxton. The latter have a pull with a friend at the docks, shipped in ahead of us. Heard tonight that the next four of us will leave in the next four days. That just includes me. Warm today. Went down to the docks twice.

**Journal**
February 14, 1919
Nothing new today. Visited the docks, but no new ships in. A crowd left here today to sail on the Niagrin. Nothing to do here. Am on duty tomorrow with a police detail. Wish we would get orders quick.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 15, 1919
Sawyer received his orders today to sail on the Ermy. That makes me the third one on the list. Three more ships are due to do in a few days. Rain all day long.

 

February 11, 1919

Posted By on July 11, 2012

**Journal**
February 11, 1919
Got the dope today. One of us will go on each boat to leave here with A.S. material. I am the 7th on the list. Two will leave day after tomorrow, one the next day and then about three next week. Looks like I’ll get out in a week.

World War One Letters Blog

Bordeaux, February 11, 1919
Dear Folks:
Well, I’m still in France. I thought by this time I surely would be on the water, but Fate has ruled otherwise. It will be about a week before I can get off. Here is the situation as it stands at present: Ten of us, from Angers, were sent here to convey material back to the United States. Our orders expressly stated that. The material is here now and they are loading it as fast as ships come in. There will be only one of us to a ship, that one being responsible for that cargo. We will be sent off in the order in which our names appear on the order. That makes me the seventh man to go. Two ships are loaded now and will sail with two of our crowd on Thursday, the 13th. That makes me the fifth. There are five more big ships unloading now, which will undoubtedly load our stuff (Liberty Motors and DH4 Planes.) That looks like “my ship” will be ready to heave off about a week or ten days from now.
World War One Letters BlogI was out to the American Docks this afternoon and saw the “Wilhelmina” sail. You remember her as a Matson liner on the Honolulu run. The “Honolulu” was in dock also. She will leave in a few days, so I won’t get her. The others are all good looking steamers, one being a Jap Maru ship. It certainly looked good to see the Wilhelmina swing out into the river this noon, and point her way toward the States. She carried hospital cases, with a few casual officers. Our material didn’t get here on time to get on her.
For the last four days we have been seeing Bordeaux. We have had absolutely nothing to do and won’t have up to the time we sail. We have been living in town at a hotel, but tomorrow we are going to move out to the Embarkation Camp near the docks, five miles out, so as to be “available” at all times. We have seen the town, so most of us are ready.
As I said in a previous letter, I received quite a lot of mail while at Angers. Some was Jan. mail. I have directed the central office to send my mail home now, so when you receive this you might just as well stop writing and begin to wait for a telegram. When you receive this I’ll probably be on the water. I suppose there is a chance of my beating it across.
Was interested in the letters about work taking place down on the Westside. Hope the rain continues and you can get in the whole eighty. As you say, there is a lot of work to be done down there. Hope the ditch water comes right along. After what I have seen here in France of farms and farming, our proposition looks pretty good. I recently saw hills and hills that were terraced, some of them ten feet high, which afforded only about a two or three foot ledge upon which to farm, and every winter their soil proper would be washed off and have to be replaced from the valley below, and rocks—there are beaucoup.
I don’t know what port we will land at in the States. The ships sail with sealed orders, so there is no “doping it out.” Whatever the port, though, there is a train for S.F. Probably will be delayed a few days getting this material off my hands. If I have a spare plane left over I’ll bring it home to you.
Lovingly,
Knox.

World War One Letters Blog

February 8-10, 1919

Posted By on July 9, 2012

World War One Letters Blog

Bordeaux, February 8, 1919
Dear Folks:
Just a few lines. I arrived here yesterday at noon from Angers. My orders read to convey some Air Service material back to the States, so we (ten of us) are waiting here for the material to show up. As soon as it does we will have it loaded and sail. We haven’t much dope yet as to how long we will have to wait here; but the indications are good, and I think my prophecy about being in N.Y. March 1st still is a good bet.
Am very glad to have come to Bordeaux. It rounds out my sight seeing tour of France very well. These ships here, all tagged for the States, look fine.
Am feeling fine as usual. Received a lot of late mail at Angers. All Nov. Dec. and some Jan. mail came. Glad to get it. Hope to see you all soon.
Lovingly,
Knox.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 9, 1919
Nothing new today. The material has arrived which we are to take back, but the office here has no authority to turn it over to us. Two ships are loading it today. Hope we get off with it. Cold here today.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 10, 1919
Nothing new today. Waiting for more definite dope to come down from Headquarters. Two ships are loading out stuff now. Seeing Bordeaux in the meantime. Wrote a letter home. Having some fine meals here.

February 6-8, 1919

Posted By on July 6, 2012

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 6, 1919
Leaving tonight for Bordeaux with nine others. Our names were posted at 3 P.M. Leave at midnight and will arrive at 10 in the A.M. We are going to convoy A.S. material back to the States. Rain here. Glad to get out.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 7, 1919
Bordeaux: Have tried to find who wants us here, but unsuccessful. Arrived at 10:30 this A.M. Staying at Hotel Bordeaux. No one here knows what to do with us. Telegraphing back to Angers for information tonight. Warmer here, and some rain. Very nice place. The ships look good.

World War One Letters Blog**Journal**
February 8, 1919
Our orders came today placing us on temporary duty here. Fifty cars of Boche motors came also, which we are to convoy to the States. Don’t know when we will sail yet. Hope it is soon. In the meantime we are seeing Bordeaux. Cold. Wrote a letter home today.

February 2-5, 1919

Posted By on July 4, 2012

**Journal**
February 2, 1919
Am held up with about 50 others. They have wired to headquarters for our cards. Wise is O.K. and is leaving tonight with 100 for Brest. Received lots of late mail here today. Expect to be here a week.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 3, 1919
Camp closed. More left tonight for ports. It makes us sick to see them go when we are held up on such a little red tape. However, our day will come. Received another letter from home today.

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 4, 1919
Camp was opened today. Went into town, and put in pay and mileage vouchers. Got some candy at commissary. No news about getting out, other than rumors that no more will leave for ten days. Was a little out of luck this time. General Pershing inspected us today.

World War One Letters Blog**Journal**
February 5, 1919
My records are all clear now. A wire came from Chairmont fixing me up O.K. Now I’m sitting on top of the world again, waiting for the next boat. Received another letter today. There was about two inches of snow this A.M. Rained all day though. Warmer.

February 1, 1919

Posted By on July 2, 2012

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
February 1, 1919
Angers: Arrived here at 5 P.M. Big crowd, 200, leaving here tonight for Brest. They say if our records are complete we will go out tomorrow. Am afraid my qualification card will hold me up.

World War One Letters BlogTours, France, February 1, 1919
Dear Folks,
Have a few minutes here at the hotel before leaving for the station to go to Angers, so will drop another line, just to give the postman another chance to ring the front door “extra long.”
We went to a fine show last night, given by one of the American stock companies over here now. Am enclosing the program. Also am enclosing a short item on some of the S.C. over here.
We heard this morning that the Angers camp had been cleared out, in which case we may not have to wait there long. The “rumors” that go around are very conflicting, hence not much reliance can be placed on any of them. The paper last night said that Pres. Wilson would return to the States between the 12th and 15th of February. It is barely possible that we might get to the port in time to make his ship. Hope so, because then we would probably make a fast trip.
Last night when we came back from the show there was a roaring fire in our fireplace and the room was nice and warm. We each had a hot bath and then jumped in. And the bed! Well, you have undoubtedly heard of the French beds. There are feathers nearly all the way to the floor, and springs the rest of the way. It is very cold outside this morning. The fountains are all frozen up, but there is no snow here as there was at Romorantin.
Have an hour to pack up my suitcase and get over to the station, so will get busy.
Lovingly,
Knox.

World War One Letters Blog

January 31, 1919

Posted By on June 29, 2012

World War One Letters Blog

**Journal**
January 31, 1919
Spent day here. Got pay and mileage checks. Went to Y.M.C.A. show this evening; saw “A Pair of Sixes” by an American Stock Co. Very good show. Going on to Angers in the A.M. Hearing all kinds of rumors about the place. Wrote home today.

World War One Letters Blog

Tours, France, January 31, 1919
Dear Folks:
Just another note from here. We arrived last night at midnight from Romorantin, the train being very late as usual in France. We had intended to go on to Angers this morning, but we changed our minds this A.M. and decided to put it off till tomorrow morning at 11:30. We both had several things to do here, and the three hours available this morning would not have been time enough. I had left my December pay voucher here with some mileage vouchers on the 3rd, so I went out to Headquarters and got the money. I had the checks cashed at the bank, so now have beaucoup francs “again.” “Again” simply refers to the fact that we were freed of 700 francs on our leave apiece. We came out well, though, because the average cost is about 800 f. with most. It was cheap at twice the cost, however.
World War One Letters BlogWe wired on to Angers that we would arrive tomorrow morning, so will be disappointed if they don’t have the band out. I am sending you a copy of the “Stars and Stripes” that come out today. In it is a little account of Angers. It is a poor impression to enter a place with, but I doubt the truth of it all. I will tell you about it when I get there.
We are going to a real American show tonight. One of the stock companies of which you have doubtless read is here at Tours. This week they are playing “A Pair of Sixes.” There is a very nice theater here and a regimental band for the orchestra. Of course there are no tickets or charges to the men or officers.
I went out to the post office here and had my address changed to Angers for the next two weeks. After that the mail will be sent to Berkeley. The average length of time a person spends at Angers is ten days; and I imagine as time goes on and their system gets to working smoother that time will be cut down.
Am very anxious to get back, now that I’ve started. Have no idea of what awaits us in N.Y. Probably a delay there at Camp Hills or Merritt. Will drop another line soon.
Lovingly,
Knox.